The STEM Advocacy Conference of Texas, started and originally founded by 2468, is a high school-based program that brings together like-minded students throughout Texas to advocate for increased government funding and support for STEM-aligned educational activities. SACOT’s goal is to support and encourage students to advocate for STEM-related legislation in Texas at both the State and local level of government. By providing resources and guidance, SACOT creates a community of high school students who believe that they can make a difference in STEM education. SACOT has held two annual conferences at the Texas Capitol in Austin, creating a collective platform and teaching advocacy skills to students. With the SACOT platform and new advocacy skills, students have been able to convincingly talk to their local government and school board about STEM education.


Campaigns

SACOT On The Clock

SACOT on the Clock allocates ten minutes once every month to SACOT activities. Designed to encourage SACOT engagement for regular members, SACOT on the Clock is a time-efficient and structured method of participation. The Executive Committee releases a schedule with a ten-minute activity planned for each month. The goal is to have every SACOT team/member to participate in robotics class at school, meetings after school, or at home.


SACOT On Tour

SACOT On Tour takes the place of our annual conference and is during even-numbered years. This way, we can effectively use our time to directly benefit underserved communities around Texas. SACOT On Tour gives SACOT members the opportunity to not only travel to underprivileged schools and speak with students, but also to set up and attend meetings with their local legislators to push for STEM education. Students in communities with a lack of STEM education can reap the benefits of RoBox camps that SACOT hosts and the new opportunities SACOT brings.


HB 395

HB 395 is a Texas house bill sponsored by Representative Cecil Bell Jr. relating to the career and technology education allotment and the essential knowledge, skills, and applications of technology education. This bill would reclassify technology application curriculum (TAC) courses as career and technology education (CTE) courses, allocating more funds for STEM courses in Texas such as Computer Science.